population

Earth Day celebrations a cruel joke on Americans, especially their children

On April 22 - Earth Day - the nation's children once again will be found "greening" up areas in their communities and doing it with great sincerity because their parents and educators tell them their efforts are making a difference.
 
Unfortunately, they are not.
 
Read more about Earth Day celebrations a cruel joke on Americans, especially their children

Earth Day in U.S. is major waste of time

Has Sen. Bennet really thought about immigration?

Article title: 
Has Sen. Bennet really thought about immigration?
Article author: 
Philip Cafaro
Article publisher: 
The Denver Post
Article date: 
Mon, 02/11/2013
Article importance: 
Medium
Article body: 

According to U.S. Sen. Michael Bennet's website, reforming immigration policy and combatting climate change are two of his key legislative goals.

But there is no evidence that the senator sees any connection between them, despite the fact that the U.N.'s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has identified population growth as one of the two key drivers of global warming, and that most of the increase in U.S. greenhouse gas emissions in the past two decades has occurred due to population growth, while per capita emissions have remained relatively flat.

 

While they have so far neglected to provide hard numbers, the Senate Gang of Eight proposes two changes that would greatly increase America's population. First, an immense amnesty covering up to 12 million illegal immigrants, who would then be able to bring in tens of millions of relatives under current "family reunification" rules. Second, a huge increase in legal immigration, among both unskilled and skilled workers.

 

 

Together, these changes could increase immigration into the U.S. by 1 million annually, to as many as 2.25 million people annually. Using Census Bureau forecasting methods, here are projections for U.S. population growth during this century:

 

• 250,000 annual immigration = 379 million in 2100;

• 1.25 million annual immigration = 524 million in 2100; and

• 2.25 million annual immigration = 669 million in 2100;




 




The Millennium Population Boom of America

Article title: 
The Millennium Population Boom of America
Article author: 
Mark Powell
Article publisher: 
The Cagle Post
Article date: 
Mon, 05/30/2011
Article importance: 
Medium
Article body: 

 In the last 20 years, the U.S. population has grown faster than ever before. From 1990 to 2010, the U.S. population grew by 60 million, a boom driven primarily by unprecedented immigration. This millennium boom handily supersedes the 54 million new human beings who arrived during the postwar prosperity of the baby boom.

 

 


Hispanics Account for More than Half of Nation’s Growth in Past Decade

Article title: 
Hispanics Account for More than Half of Nation’s Growth in Past Decade
Article author: 
by Jeffrey S. Passel, D’Vera Cohn, Hugo Lopez
Article publisher: 
Pew Hispanic Center
Article date: 
Thu, 03/24/2011
Article importance: 
Medium
Article body: 

The 2010 Census counted 50.5 million Hispanics in the United States, making up 16.3% of the total population. The nation's Latino population, which was 35.3 million in 2000, grew 43% over the decade. The Hispanic population also accounted for most of the nation's growth—56%—from 2000 to 2010.

(See more re: U.S. population growth during the last decade.)

 

Census: Hispanics Fuel Nebraska Population Growth

Article title: 
Census: Hispanics Fuel Nebraska Population Growth
Article subtitle: 
Hispanics accounted for 63 percent of the growth
Article publisher: 
Nebraska State Paper
Article date: 
Thu, 03/03/2011
Article importance: 
Medium
Article body: 

The new federal census shows Nebraska’s population increased by 115,078 in the last ten years. For the most part, the growth is all about Hispanics. 

 

The just-released 2010 census says there are 1.8 million Nebraskans.

 

Hispanics accounted for 63 percent of the state’s overall growth. Nebraska has 167,405 Hispanic residents; that number is up nearly 73,000 since the 2000 census.

 

Most of the overall population growth was in the eastern part of the state, and most of that growth was in Douglas, Lancaster or Sarpy counties. More than half of the state’s population lives in one of those counties.

 

 

Population Up 27 Million in Just 10 Years

Article title: 
Population Up 27 Million in Just 10 Years
Article publisher: 
Center for Immigration Studies
Article date: 
Sun, 01/16/2011
Article importance: 
Medium
Article body: 

Immigration Drives Huge Increase; Since 1980, Population Up 82 million, Equal to Calif., Texas & N.Y.

WASHINGTON, Dec. 21, 2010 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Most of the media coverage of the 2010 Census will likely focus on the country's changing racial composition and the redistribution of seats in Congress. But neither of these is the most important finding. Rather, it is the dramatic increase in the size of the U.S. population itself that has profound implications for our nation's quality of life and environment. Most of the increase has been, and will continue to be, a result of one federal policy: immigration. Projections into the future from the Census Bureau show we are on track to add 130 million more people to the U.S. population in the just the next 40 years, primarily due to future immigration.  This press release can also be found online at: http://cis.org/2010CensusPopulation.

  • Immigration accounted for three-quarters of population growth during the decade. Census Bureau data found 13.1 million new immigrants (legal and illegal) who arrived in the last 10 years; there were also about 8.2 million births to immigrant women during the decade.(1)

 

Population, Immigration, and the Drying of the American Southwest

Article title: 
Population, Immigration, and the Drying of the American Southwest
Article author: 
Kathleene Parker
Article publisher: 
Center for Immigration Studies
Article date: 
Wed, 11/10/2010
Article importance: 
Medium
Article body: 

This Backgrounder offers an historical overview of the critical issue of water in the American Southwest, where the water situation is becoming increasingly dire during a prolonged — but not uncharacteristic — drought in the arid region. We also examine the demographic trends that drive high rates of U.S. and, as a result, Southwest population growth. We present evidence that indicates there is insufficient water for the region’s current population, much less the larger future populations that will result if immigration continues at its present high rate.

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